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A Sure-Fire Way to Know God’s Will for Your Life

“What is God’s will for my life?”

That is one of the most frequently asked questions by Christians, often in a voice tinged with anguish, confusion, longing or fear – sometimes all of them at once. It is a legitimate question because as sincere Christians we want to honor God in all that we do. Knowing His will is an important part of that.

The question is often asked by young people in college or soon after graduation, when they realize that the real world awaits. Is it God’s will that I take a job in the secular world or that I go into full-time Christian work? And if so, is it God’s will that I attend a seminary or go onto the mission field? Is it God’s will that I marry that cute girl I saw in church but whose name I don’t even know yet?

But older people ask it as well, sometimes with even more angst because there are families, bills and prestige to consider. Is it God’s will that I go back to school? Is that job offer three states away God’s will for my life? Is it God’s will that I buy a motorcycle instead of car because of the better gas mileage? (Yes, I’ve actually heard that one.)

I’ve wrestled with the question myself and I’m sure you have too. Doing God’s will is important. So what if I told you a sure-fire way to determine God’s no-doubt-about-it will for your life? Interested?

OK, here’s how you do it – read the Bible.

Oh, did that disappoint you? After all, the Bible says nothing about going back to school, or job offers in other states, or marrying cute girls, and is especially silent on the motorcycle vs. car debate.

God has made it abundantly clear what His will is for our lives – He’s stated it and in most cases restated it more than once.

But it is chock-full of passages about God’s will for your life. Let’s take a look at a few of them.

It is God’s will that you:

  • Love God with all your heart, soul and strength. It says so in Deut. 6:5 and Jesus emphasized it in Matt. 22:37, Mark: 12:30 and Luke 10:27.
  • Love your neighbor as yourself. Lev. 19:18, Matt. 22:39, Mark 12:31, Luke 10:27
  • Love one another as believers. John 15:12, 1 John 4:11-12
  • Make disciples. Matt. 28:19, 1 Cor. 11:1, Heb. 13:7
  • Be generous. Mal. 3:8-10, Luke 6:38, 1 Tim. 6:17-19
  • Live in victory. John 10:10, John 16:33, 1 Cor. 15:57
  • Keep His commands. John 14:15, 1 John 2:3
  • Be thankful. 1 Thess. 5:18, Eph. 5:20

There are a number of other things that are God’s will as well, such as prayer, submitting to one another and being filled with the Spirit. If you are a married man, it is God’s will that you love your wife unconditionally as Christ loved the church; if you are a married woman, it is God’s will that you submit to your husband as the church submits to Christ.

Maybe we should start by asking, “Am I doing God’s will that He has already revealed to me in His Word?”

The point is, God has made it abundantly clear what His will is for our lives – He’s stated it and in most cases restated it more than once. So before we ask, “What is God’s will for my life?” when facing new situations, maybe we should start by asking, “Am I doing God’s will that He has already revealed to me in His Word?”

If we’re not already loving and being generous and living in victory, etc., then maybe we should concentrate more on those things before wondering about that out-of-state job or the cute nameless potential marriage partner. It’s not that God doesn’t care about those things, or that He doesn’t have a will for those areas of our lives. He does. But it seems rather self-serving to seek His will in the unknown if we’re not already living in His known will.

Plus, there’s a good chance that once we start following His will as outlined in His Word, the path of His will in those other situations, even regarding motorcycles and cars, will become much clearer.

Science Finally Catches Up to Concept That’s Been in the Bible for Thousands of Years

The other day I read an interesting article about a neat little trick our brains do to us called experience-dependent neuroplasticity. Before your eyes glaze over, let me explain this amazing brain ability.

The brain can actually rewire its neurons to help you remember things better and faster. If you think the same thoughts over and over, the brain starts grouping those neurons together to make it easier for you to access those thoughts. It’s part of the learning process that makes it easier, for example, for you recall the facts and processes you need to do your job well.

Here’s the bad part – the brain does the same thing even if we keep thinking negative thoughts. So if you complain a lot or are a worry wart, your brain helpfully starts grouping those neurons together. “You want to worry?” your brain asks. “Here, let me make it easier for you.”

The concept of neuroplasticity has only been around in the scientific/psychology realm for less than 70 years, and is just recently starting to be accepted as a modern discovery of how to help people move from negativity to a more positive outlook.

Since He designed our brains, God he knew they would tend get stuck in a rut of thinking the same wrong thoughts over and over.

Except the concept isn’t modern at all – God revealed it in Scripture thousands of years ago.

Since He designed our brains, God he knew they would tend get stuck in a rut of thinking the same wrong thoughts over and over. But the great thing about neuroplasticity is that works both ways – yes, it can make negative thoughts easier to access, but when we train it with positive thoughts, it also makes positive thoughts easier to reach. So God outlined plenty of encouragement and ways for us to turn neuroplasticity into a rut of correct thoughts.

For example, in Deut. 6:4 we have the Shema, later quoted by Jesus, which tells us to love the Lord with all our heart, soul and strength. But it continues with a command that shows the importance of neuroplasticity in positive thoughts.

“These words that I am giving you today are to be in your heart. Repeat them to your children. Talk about them when you sit in your house and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Bind them as a sign on your hand and let them be a symbol on your forehead. Write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.” (Deut. 6:6-9)

In other words, keep repeating God’s words over and over so that your brain reroutes the neurons to make them easy to recall.

This concept of using the brain’s innate ability is found throughout the Bible.

The more we think about God’s word and His character, the easier our brain will make it for us to keep thinking that way.

In Philippians 4, Paul instructs us to not worry about anything (don’t let negative thoughts dominate your mind so that they’re easy to recall). Instead, he tells us in Phil. 4:8, “Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable—if there is any moral excellence and if there is any praise—dwell on these things.”

In Romans 12:2, he instructs us to not be conformed to the world but instead “be transformed by the renewing of your mind.” Why? So that we may discern “what is the good, pleasing, and perfect will of God.”

In the very first Psalm, we find this principle at work: “How happy is the man who does not follow the advice of the wicked or take the path of sinners or join a group of mockers. Instead, his delight is in the Lord’s instruction, and he meditates on it day and night.” The Psalmists frequently encourage meditating on God’s word and His character: “I will reflect on all you have done and meditate on your actions.” (Ps. 77:12)

So the more we think about God’s word and His character, the easier our brain will make it for us to keep thinking that way. It will allow us to do His will, to not be anxious or worry and to live a life that is an example to others. Thinking about God will become a self-perpetuating habit.

Neuroplasticity may seem like a recent breakthrough in the study of the brain science, but Bible readers have known about it for thousands of years. God has known about this little brain trick all along because He created it.

Bible Translations: One Language Defied Translation for 180 Bloody Years

John Wycliffe giving his Bible translation to the common people. From a painting by William Frederick Yeames, 1835-1918

Parts or all of the Bible have been translated into more than 2,100 languages. But there was one language that almost didn’t get a Bible translation because of the deadly controversy surrounding it.

Translating the Bible into this language was a dangerous task, often ending in the death of the translator. It took almost 200 years before the Bible finally appeared in this language. You might think it was Arabic, given the natural animosity between the Islam and Christianity. Or perhaps Latin, given the early opposition to Christianity by the Romans. Or perhaps Chinese or Russian.

But no.

It was English.

The Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament). In the late 300s A.D., Jerome translated it into Latin, which became known as the Vulgate (or common person’s) Bible. It was the standard of the Roman Catholic Church for the next millennium.

John Wycliffe came along with the strong belief that the Bible should be translated into English.

However, despite its name, few common people at that time could read the Vulgate – or read anything, since formal education was only for the elite. That meant only the priests had the knowledge of what the Bible said, and the population had to trust their interpretation of it.

In the 1380s, John Wycliffe came along with the strong belief that the Bible should be translated into English. He began the translation process from the Latin Vulgate. He produced dozens of handwritten copies of the Bible. But the Roman Catholic Church saw this as a direct affront to its authority, and had him excommunicated. His work so enraged a later Pope that 44 years after Wycliffe’s death, he had Wycliffe’s bones dug up, crushed and scattered in a river.

An engraving from Foxe’s Book of Martyrs showing Wycliffe’s bones being burned and the ashes dumped into the river.

One of Wycliffe’s protégés, John Hus, continued his work. For his troubles, he was burned at the stake in 1415. The fire was ignited using Wycliffe’s English translations of the Bible.

In 1517, Martin Luther started the Protestant Reformation and along with it began translating the Bible into his native German. But English was still non grata. While Luther worked on his German translation, seven people were burned at the stake for teaching their children to recite the Lord’s Prayer in English.

William Tyndale befriended Luther and in 1526 successfully printed the first English copies of the New Testament. They were quickly confiscated and burned. Tyndale was imprisoned and finally, in 1536, it was decided that one death wasn’t enough for him – he was strangled and burned at the stake. A year later, two of his disciples, Myles Coverdale and John Rogers, managed to successfully publish the entire Bible in English.

An illustration of William Tyndale being strangled before he was burned at the stake. His final words were, “Lord, open the king of England’s eyes.”

What finally turned the tide in bringing the Bible to the English-speaking world was not a great reformer, but a king who wanted to have his way. King Henry VIII, who famously had eight wives, made a break from the Roman Catholic Church when the Pope refused to grant him a divorce. He formed his own church, which became known as the Anglican Church, which was neither Catholic nor Protestant. Coverdale was hired in 1541 to produce an English Bible for this new church.

The peace was short-lived. In 1553, the Queen known as Bloody Mary assumed the throne and returned England to the Catholicism. Some of the blood on her hands belonged to Bible translators, including Rogers. Coverdale escaped to Geneva, Switzerland, where he continued his work. Finally in 1560 – 180 years after Wycliffe began the translations – the Swiss church published the first English version of the scriptures, which became known as the Geneva Bible.

The Roman Catholic church, recognizing it had been beat, produced their own English version in the 1580s, although since it was based on the error-prone Latin Vulgate, was not considered as accurate as the Geneva Bible. When King James I assumed the throne, he returned England to the Anglican Church. It was under his authority that an Anglican version of the Bible was printed in 1611, which was heavily influenced by the Roman Catholic version. It became the popular King James Version that would dominate English speaking churches for more than 250 years.

When the first Protestants sailed to America, for example, it was the Geneva Bible that crossed the ocean with them.

The Geneva Bible was the first to mark chapters and verses and was immensely popular for the next 80 years, outshining the King James Version for several decades.

When the first Protestants sailed to America, for example, it was the Geneva Bible that crossed the ocean with them, and it remained popular in the new country into the 1800s. But the King James Version was the first English Bible to be printed in America.

After almost 200 years of bloodshed, more than 200 years of peace reigned as virtually all English speakers began using the King James Version. It wasn’t until 1880 that the English Revised Version of the Bible turned some people from the KJV. It was also the first Bible, either Protestant or Catholic, to remove the Apocrypha from between the testaments.

The KJV continues to be the Bible of choice slightly more than half of Americans.

That started a wave of English translations over the next 140 years, including the American Standard in 1901 and the New American Standard in 1971. In 1973, the New International Version was produced and has since become popular in evangelical churches. In 1982, the New King James Version was printed. The English Standard Version joined the popular translations in 2002 and the Holman Christian Standard Bible in 2004. A revision of the Holman Bible, the Christian Standard Bible, was released in 2017.

But more than 400 years later, the KJV continues to be the Bible of choice slightly more than half of Americans. The NIV ranks second (between 11 and 19 percent, depending on the survey), the only other English version that garners double-digit popularity.

Through various Bible apps you can now view dozens of English translations of the Bible. And if you’re so inclined, Bible Gateway app offers the opportunity to read the Bible that started it all, the Geneva Bible.

Gary Kauffman is a freelance writer, photographer and Bible teacher in North Augusta, S.C.

Reading in Context: The Best Thing Since Sliced Bread

Healthy eating is important to everyone, but even more important is healthy Bible reading.

I was reminded of this recently when I came across information about Ezekiel bread. Apparently it’s nothing new, but this particular reference was urging Christians to eschew regular bread in favor of Ezekiel bread. This bread is made from a “recipe” found in Ezekiel 4:9:  “Also take wheat, barley, beans, lentils, millet, and spelt. Put them in a single container and make them into bread for yourself.”

The idea is that all these things mixed together create a far superior and more nutritious bread than bread made from wheat, especially bread made from refined flour. This reference touted it as being God’s plan to keep us healthy.

That all sounds great, especially since it actually quotes a Bible verse. What could be better than following God’s recipe? But here is the danger in taking things out of context. When God gave this recipe to Ezekiel, it wasn’t because it was a good thing to eat but because it was a bad thing to eat.

God’s Strange Command to Ezekiel

Here is the context of Ezekiel 4: God has instructed the prophet to make a drawing of the city of Jerusalem, set up a model of it being attacked by a foreign army and then he is to lie in front of it on his left side for 390 days – a little more than a year. After that, he gets to change sides! But he’s only going to be on his right side for a mere 40 days.

During this time he is to eat this bread made from the four grains and two legumes. And he is to bake it using human excrement as fuel – that’s right, human excrement. When the prophet protests, God relents and allows him to use cow dung as the fuel source. Whew!

Like lying on his side, this bread recipe also serves as an illustration for the people of Israel. “The Lord said, ‘This is how the Israelites will eat their bread—ceremonially unclean—among the nations where I will banish them.’” (Ezek. 4:13)

That’s right, Ezekiel’s bread was considered an affront to God. Touching or eating anything unclean in those days meant you were basically banished from society until you could make yourself clean again. So Ezekiel was not considering any health benefits coming from this bread.

Although it doesn’t say what about this recipe makes it unclean, it is probably because of the mixing of grains and legumes. In the Old Testament law, mixing of two things was often prohibited – the Israelites weren’t allowed to plant two types of grain together, they weren’t allowed to plow with both an ox and mule yoked together, they weren’t allowed to breed two types of cattle and they weren’t allowed to make clothing from two types of fabric.

While making bread from more than one type of grain isn’t specifically forbidden in the law, the general rule of not mixing unlike things together probably applied to this as well. That is why the bread made in Ezek. 4:9 would be considered ceremonially unclean.

The Importance of Context

This is an illustration of what happens when we decided to focus on one verse without the entire context. We can mistakenly think it means one thing when, in fact, it may mean the exact opposite. Unfortunately, with the advent of verse-of-the-day apps and large video screens in churches showing only the specific verse a pastor is citing, we often see verses out of context.

I have nothing against those apps or video screens, but even when the verse is being cited correctly, we can miss the deeper and richer meaning we get when we view it in context. And sometimes another verse within the context will have an even more significant personal application. That is why it is always advisable to consider verses in context, even from people you trust. This is the healthy way to read scripture.

After Peter’s vision of the clean and the unclean in Acts 10, we as Christians generally believe that the prohibition of eating unclean things has been lifted for us. So there is nothing that prohibits Christians from eating Ezekiel bread (although at around $19 a loaf, the question of stewardship of finances may arise). It may even have all the health benefits it touts.

However, if you hear anyone claiming Christians should eat Ezekiel bread because this is God’s health plan as stated in Ezek. 4:9, advise them to read the context of the reference. And please ask what they’re using as a fuel source for baking.